Aug 4, 2009

Porn, Not Erotica

EroticaRevealed.com posted a review of Freedom is Slavery! Unfortunately, it's not glowing... or even that positive.

The reviewer, Kathleen Bradean, makes a lot of valid points. The biggest has to be that I write "porn" and not "erotica." It may be tough differentiation for my male mind to overcome. It's one I've heard before (shortly before going "to press" one of my best friends lambasted me for being a pornographer and warned me that my reputation would be ruined by Freedom is Slavery) and one with which I continue to struggle. Sometimes I think that the only difference is that erotica requires a minimum of eight paragraphs of foreplay while porn maxes out at two. I'm sure there's more to it, but that's what my prurient mind can best discern. Other opinions are welcome -- about the difference between Porn and Erotica as well as about the book. :)

Even though it's not the most positive review, I'm still thrilled that at least one more person has suffered through my filth.

Read the full review here.

1 comment:

Faith O'Shea said...

So, basically, your stories were reviewed by a woman who can't hold a book and masturbate at the same time. I am truly wracking my brain to come up with an activity that I *couldn't* masturbate during.... hmm... rock climbing, perhaps? The next book she reviews should be The Idiot's Guide to Self-Pleasure.

Freedom is a collection of short stories -- that, in and of itself, should loosen the porn restraint. Lest every story end up being candlelight and foreshadow, chased with a endnote punch, activities presented have to be a bit more told rather than shown.

What she ultimately failed to realize is you're not a professional erotic writer -- which is to say, these are *your* fantasies, rather than a wide net that was tossed each time you set pen to paper as you met a deadline. This makes the product inherently more specific. In one of your stories, either this precise sequence of events arouses the reader, or it doesn't -- but it wasn't manufactured *for* the reader... a recipe which, I think, makes the incidents of meshing with the reader that much more potent. "Someone else finds *this* exact scenario arousing, too!" That's one hell of an arousing prospect.

Too bad the reviewer was too accustomed to being spoon-fed by authors who arouse by numbers.